10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)

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1.He was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1987.

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
2.Nimoy was nominated three times for an Emmy for his role on Star Trek.

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
3.Like his character of Spock, Nimoy was a vegetarian.

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
4.He was a war veteran and a scholar and worked several odds jobs before he became an actor

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
5.He was a photographer

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
6.Nimoy came up with Star Trek’s Vulcan salute, which was inspired by a Jewish tradition

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
7.Nimoy cried watching that Star Trek death scene as well

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
8.Nimoy directed 3 Men and a Baby

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
9.He used to co-own a pet store

10 Useless Facts About Leonard Nimoy (or Spock)
10.He voiced the character Galvatron in The Transformers: The Movie

Leonard Simon Nimoy (/ˈnmɔɪ/; March 26, 1931 – February 27, 2015) was an American actor, film director, poet, singer and photographer. He was known for his role as Mr. Spock of the Star Trek franchise.

Nimoy began his career in his early twenties, teaching acting classes in Hollywood and making minor film and television appearances through the 1950s, as well as playing the title role in Kid Monk Baroni. Foreshadowing his fame as a semi-alien, he played Narab, one of three Martian invaders in the 1952 movie serial Zombies of the Stratosphere.

In 1965, he made his first appearance in the rejected Star Trek pilot “The Cage“, and went on to play the character of Spock until 1969, followed by eight feature films and guest slots in the various spin-off series. The character has had a significant cultural impact and garnered Nimoy three Emmy Award nominations; TV Guide named Spock one of the 50 greatest TV characters. After the original Star Trek series, Nimoy starred in Mission: Impossible for two seasons, hosted the documentary series In Search of…, narrated Civilization IV, and made several well-received stage appearances. He also had a recurring role in the science fiction seriesFringe.

Nimoy’s fame as Spock was such that both of his autobiographies, I Am Not Spock (1975) and I Am Spock (1995), were written from the viewpoint of sharing his existence with the character. Nimoy has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

In February 2014, Nimoy revealed that he had been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a condition he attributed to a smoking habit he had given up approximately 30 years prior.[75] On February 19, 2015, Nimoy was taken to UCLA Medical Center for chest pain and had been in and out of hospitals for the “past several months.”[76]

Nimoy died on February 27, 2015 at the age of 83 in his Bel Air home from complications of COPD. He is survived by his wife, two children, six grandchildren and a great-grandchild. A few days before his death, Nimoy shared some of his poetry on social media website Twitter: “A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP“.

On Twitter, William Shatner wrote of Nimoy, “I loved him like a brother. … We will all miss his humor, his talent, and his capacity to love.” George Takei stated, “The word extraordinary is often overused, but I think it’s really appropriate for Leonard. He was an extraordinarily talented man, but he was also a very decent human being.”Walter Koenig said he knew the Spock character better than he did Nimoy at first. “When I finally did get to know the man better I discovered his compassion, his intelligence and his humanity. All of which laid the foundation for his keen sense of philanthropy.”[81] Nichelle Nichols wrote, “Leonard’s integrity and passion as an actor and devotion to his craft helped transport Star Trek into television history.” Zachary Quinto, who portrayed Spock as a young man in Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness, wrote, “My heart is broken. I love you profoundly my dear friend. And I will miss you every day.”

U.S. President Barack Obama paid tribute to Nimoy, whom he called “a lifelong lover of the arts and humanities, a supporter of the sciences, generous with his talent and his time.” Former NASA astronaut Buzz Aldrin called Nimoy “a fellow space traveler because he helped make the journey into the final frontier accessible to us all.”