First Trailer for Season Two of ‘True Detective’

First Trailer for Season Two of ‘True Detective’

HBO has released the first teaser trailer for the upcoming second season of their gritty crime drama television series True Detective. The new action-packed season comes with a whole new cast — Colin Farrell, Vince Vaughn, Rachel McAdams, and Taylor Kitsch — and a new dark story about a “bizarre murder” in California. The second season is scheduled to premiere June 21, 2015 on HBO. [via Laughing Squid]

A bizarre murder brings together three law-enforcement officers and a career criminal, each of whom must navigate a web of conspiracy and betrayal in the scorched landscapes of California. Colin Farrell is Ray Velcoro, a compromised detective in the all-industrial City of Vinci, LA County. Vince Vaughn plays Frank Semyon, a criminal and entrepreneur in danger of losing his life’s work, while his wife and closest ally (Kelly Reilly), struggles with his choices and her own. Rachel McAdams is Ani Bezzerides, a Ventura County Sheriff’s detective often at odds with the system she serves, while Taylor Kitsch plays Paul Woodrugh, a war veteran and motorcycle cop for the California Highway Patrol who discovers a crime scene which triggers an investigation involving three law enforcement groups, multiple criminal collusions, and billions of dollars.

 

True Detective was considered among the best television shows of 2014 by the American press. Its first season garnered an 84% approval rating from 64 critics—an average rating of 8.5 out of 10—from the review aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes, which said: “In True Detective, performances by Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey reel the viewer in, while the style, vision and direction make it hard to turn away.” Season one also holds an 87 out of 100 Metacritic score, based on 41 reviews, indicating “universal acclaim”. British philosopher Nick Land called True Detective “the most intelligent series in TV history”. Tim Goodman, writing for The Hollywood Reporter, identified the acting, dialogue, and sleek production as its most satisfying attributes. HitFix‘s Alan Sepinwall agreed, and believed that these qualities “speak to the value of the hybrid anthology format Pizzolatto is using here … points to a potentially fascinating shift in dramatic series television.” In his review for Vanity Fair, Richard Lawson said that the program successfully marries Fukunaga’s “portentous, heavy palette” with Pizzolatto’s script, producing “a captivating and offbeat tweak of a well-worn genre”. The Daily Telegraph critic Chris Harvey hailed True Detective as “the most ambitious TV drama for a long time”. Some critics, however, were not as enthusiastic in their reviews of True Detective. The New York Times journalist Mike Hale and Slant Magazine thought the script too readily deferred to religion as its narrative backbone, while Hank Steuver, from The Washington Post, believed the show fell short of its own ambitions.

The ensemble performances, chiefly McConaughey and Harrelson, were frequently mentioned in the critiques. Robert Bianco in USA Today wrote that the duo met, and even exceeded occasionally, the “enormously high” performance expectations of the “golden age of TV acting”. David Wiegand of San Francisco Chronicle singled out the two men for being “in a class of their own”, and Los Angeles Times journalist Robert Lloyd said that their work was of “a very high order”. The Boston Globe singled out Monaghan for her work on the show. Variety ’​s Brian Lowry said the True Detective cast consisted of “fine players on the periphery”.